Events > Annual Conference > Programme > Synopses

Feedback
Banner


Synopses

We are currently working on bringing you an exciting and inspiring conference programme; session synopses will show here as and when confirmed.

 

Plenaries  

Monday 30 March 2020

09:20 - 10:20

Plenary 1: Hopes, Dreams and Sleepless Nights - 10 future student trends you really need to know about

Speaker: Jim Tudor, Founder, Future Index

Synopsis: A fast-paced look at various trends converging to paint a picture of student engagement in the run up to 2025. Some trends will be alive and kicking now; others will be quietly simmering away. We’ll look at future learning, skills, well-being, aspiration and connectivity, within a context of future careers, changing technology, globalisation and the increasing importance of purpose and social responsibility. Using insights from employers, universities, students and the emerging ‘Generation Alpha’. All must-know stuff to contextualise future campuses. 

11:00 - 12:00

Plenary 2: Fire, Water and Collapse – the unholy trinity of threats to your estate

SpeakersProfessor John Cole, Independent Consultant; Gary Jebb, Director of Estates, The University of Edinburgh and Dawson Stelfox, Consultant Conservation Architect, Consarc Design Group

Synopsis: Highlighted by the Edinburgh Schools situation which resulted in the collapse of the outer leaf of a number of PFI schools constructed in the period 1995 – 2005. The subsequent and inevitable enquiry was headed by John Cole who was formerly Head of Health Estates in Northern Ireland and has highlighted quite considerable challenges on supervision of publicly funded construction right across Scotland. He and the subsequent report has also brought to the fore issues with fire stopping. Knowing that many universities take differing approaches to construction this session explores what might be lurking in your estate and how to learn lessons from the past.

13:30 - 14:30

Plenary 3: Psychological Wellbeing at Work: causes, consequences and solutions

Speaker: Professor Ivan Robertson, Director, Robertson Cooper Ltd

Synopsis: For most people of working age their experiences in the workplace have a significant influence on their overall levels of psychological wellbeing. Work-related positive and negative influences on psychological wellbeing are much less apparent than factors that affect physical health and even for well-intentioned managers it may be hard to grasp the key drivers of wellbeing at work.

This presentation will cover three main areas:

• the role of psychological well-being in physical health, individual performance and organisational outcomes and why enhanced psychological wellbeing is win-win for individuals and organisations;

• the factors that influence psychological wellbeing at work, including workplace stressors, personal factors, management and leadership;

• interventions that can be used to protect and improve psychological wellbeing to help people have more good days at work.

15:00 - 16:00

Plenary 4: How Being Good Became Looking Good: the changing value of beauty 

SpeakerHeather Widdows, John Ferguson Professor of Global Ethics, Department of Philosophy and Deputy Pro-Vice-Chancellor (Research Impact)

Synopsis: In this talk, Professor Heather Widdows will explore how the beauty ideal has changed, and how our bodies have become ourselves. Professor Widdows tracks the features of the contemporary beauty ideal, explains why it is different from previous beauty ideals and why this matters. She will finish with how we should respond to the increasing obsession with appearance and the rise of body image anxiety to epidemic proportions.

Tuesday 31 March 2020

09:10 - 10:10

Plenary 5: The Positive and Negative Impacts of New Digital and Technology Norms on Work and Personal Use

Speaker: James Thomas, Chief Technology Officer, Wellcome Trust

Synopsis: In this session you will be shown some of the new norms for digital and technology adoption and use. We will probe the differences between generations and tools they use. Explore the blurry boundary between personal use and work use of technology. We will look at some of the cool things and not so cool things that technology can do. Hopefully it will give you a few take away points for future consideration. James will bring examples from general life and the world of medical research.

10:50 - 11:50

Plenary 6: The Experience Revolution – the great opportunity

Speaker: Chris Moriarty, Director of Insight and Engagement, Institute of Workplace and Facilities Management (IWFM)

Synopsis: For so long our profession has focused on buildings but increasingly organisations are understanding the power of creating an experience. Workplace and Facilities Managers are in the prime seat to lead this change but it will require a fundamental change to their DNA. Chris will map out that change, explain how it has to influence every decision we make and what the growing importance of this shift is if we’re to secure a bright future.

09:30 - 10:30

Plenary 7: Future Human Behaviour and Your Business Strategy

Speaker: Thimon de Jong, Founder, WHETSTON

Synopsis: A deep dive into the profound future behavioural changes in response to a rapidly digitalising post-truth world. Trust levels in society are imploding whilst tech developments are exploding spectacularly. What does this mean for society, organisations and leadership? How are we going to embrace the next generation of technology? And who and what kind of information are we going to trust when we have to make (business) decisions?

11:00 - 12:00

Plenary 8:

Speakers:

Synopsis:

 

 

Workshop Sessions

Tuesday 31 March 2020

13:20 - 14:20: Workshop Sessions Block A

Session 1: Delivering Integrated Facilities Within a More Efficient and Sustainable Estate - a work shadowing framework for the HE sector

Speakers: Naomi Ashenden, Head of Estates Planning and Compliance, Keele University; Steve Jordan, Assistant Director of Estates and Facilities/ Head of Capital Projects, University of Manchester; Barry Morton, Director - Facilities Services, University of Glasgow; Anna Cockman, Head of Estates Development (Project Delivery), Lancaster University; Jonathan Craner, Senior Project Manager, University of Portsmouth; Ian Millar, Assistant Director of the Built Environment, University of Exeter; Richard Jenden, Director of Property and Space Strategy, London School of Economics and Political Science and Jack Hunter, Head of Improvements, Newcastle University

Synopsis: In these volatile times the HE sector faces an array of external challenges and the need to create a more efficient, resilient and sustainable estate grows. We consider that integrated facilities could be developed and enhanced by sharing knowledge, skills and best practise between institutions. Our proposal sets out a scalable scheme which will enable estates divisions across all Universities to upskill their staff by engaging at an individual level with their peer network, or at a more structured level through secondment or job shadowing. This proposal has focused on job shadowing and how we can acquire the skills we need.

Session 2: Capital Database (AUDE)

Speakers: Ken Kinsella, Director of Capital Development, The London School of Economics

Synopsis: Updates and a live demonstration of functionality and capability of the AUDE Capital Cost Database; an online repository developed to capture and benchmark cost data in a central location.

Session 3: HE Space Management for a Small Planet

Speakers: Simon Carter, Managing Director, Anticus Consulting and Helen Wallace, Head of Space Management and Design, University of Exeter 

Synopsis: This session will seek to present a direct challenge and stimulate open debate about the way that we manage our HE spaces in light of the call to act differently triggered by the declaration of a climate emergency. We will look both to the future and past to explore different models of usage and take lessons from the commercial sector where a constant drive for efficiency, productivity and wellbeing has been more radically addressed for the last decade. How can we take a different approach and how can we address the specific challenges of implementing them within the HE sector?

No stone will be left unturned!! 

Session 4: Sustainable Campus

Speaker: Emma Deraze, Senior Data Scientist, Times Higher Education

Synopsis: Achieving the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) will be vital if we are to have a liveable planet for our children. Universities must play a role, but the goals were not explicitly designed for the higher education sector. As key holders of intellectual, financial and physical resources, universities have a huge part to play. In 2019, Times Higher Education launched our University Impact Ranking, using the SDGs as a template for measuring universities’ efforts and achievements in the realm of sustainability. Within this framework, estates and those who manage them play a major role. In this session we will discuss the various aspects of a university campus that can be viewed through the lens of sustainability – and we hope to hear your views and ideas on how those many goals can be achieved.

Session 5: The Rise of the Apps: digitalisation is the key 

Speaker: Parth Mehta, Strategic Market Lead – Campus, Siemens

Synopsis: How do you create a smart campus, which runs efficiently and gives students a great experience? The key lies in digitalisation.

Through the implementation of a central digital platform and connecting this to your different management and operational systems, you can get insight into your campus like never before.

Giving access to this platform turns your campus into a living lab for students and engagement with industry.  Students and researchers alike can work with the live data from different systems for their studies and develop innovations and technologies, even creating new partnerships. With more transparency over energy consumption and room occupancy, this allows you to take action to make efficiencies and identify productivity gains.

In this session, Parth will take you through the Living Lab concept, give examples of best practices with digital platforms and apps to increase productivity and efficiency. The focus will then be on you and your key challenges, to identify solutions to these challenges by the end of the workshop.

15:00 - 16:00: Workshop Sessions Block B

Session 6: More Diversity, Better Estates?

Speaker: Simon Fanshawe OBE

Synopsis: In this interactive session, Simon Fanshawe, AUDE conference host, will present the Insight feedback from delegates about diversity at the AUDE conference and then explore the dividends that greater diversity can bring to Estates Departments in a fast changing context of student demand, technology and big data and the re-imagining of learning and research spaces.

Session 7: Successful Insourcing

Speakers: Gordon Parker, Managing Director, Coretex International

Synopsis: At the AUDE 2019 Annual Conference, held in Lancaster, members voted overwhelmingly in favour of insourcing in preference to outsourcing. There has been a trend towards insourcing and away from outsourcing in recent years. What good practice should organisations follow to make a successful initiative and realise the benefits of insourcing?

This session will present a case study of the insourcing of security and cleaning services at Kings College London. This exercise took references from insourcing at other London universities, also initiated as a result of public and Union pressure to treat these staff fairly.

This session will also present the experience compiled by staff engaged in the Kings College exercise, together with tools and practical proposals and learning points for making a success of such an exercise. 

Session 8: Building Information Modelling (BIM) for Estates

Speakers: Brett Plant, Information Manager and Hadeel Safaa Saadoon, Building Information, Manager both of Coventry University Estates

Synopsis: This session will be presented by University Estates (clients/ owners/ operators) who have been implementing BIM at various stages of the building life cycle from design to construction and operation.

BIM4Estates Chair and BIM Manager Hadeel Saadoon and Brett Plant, Estates Information Manager will discuss implementing BIM at Coventry University Estates and will also touch on the experiences shared by colleagues and fellow universities who joined the BIM4Estates group throughout the past year.

Session 9: The Rise of the Apps: digitalisation is the key 

Speaker: Parth Mehta, Strategic Market Lead – Campus, Siemens

Synopsis: How do you create a smart campus, which runs efficiently and gives students a great experience? The key lies in digitalisation.

Through the implementation of a central digital platform and connecting this to your different management and operational systems, you can get insight into your campus like never before.

Giving access to this platform turns your campus into a living lab for students and engagement with industry.  Students and researchers alike can work with the live data from different systems for their studies and develop innovations and technologies, even creating new partnerships. With more transparency over energy consumption and room occupancy, this allows you to take action to make efficiencies and identify productivity gains.

In this session, Parth will take you through the Living Lab concept, give examples of best practices with digital platforms and apps to increase productivity and efficiency. The focus will then be on you and your key challenges, to identify solutions to these challenges by the end of the workshop.

Session 10: Circular Economy and the University Estate

Speakers: Andy Nolan, Development and Sustainability Director, University of Nottingham; Reniera O’Donnell, Higher Education Lead, Ellen MacArthur Foundation and Dr. Roddy Yarr, Assistant Director (Sustainability and Environmental Management), University of Strathclyde

Synopsis: This session will focus on what the circular economy means for you and how university estates management can support the global shift to a circular economy. Hear from the Ellen MacArthur Foundation and understand what we mean by the Circular Economy, hear case studies from Universities that have embraced circular economy in their procurement and built environment and identify lessons learned. As well as how estates and built and managed, higher education has significant impact on the transition to a circular economy through teaching the next generation, applied research to support business and enabling the environment for student-led activities. The session will also offer space for discussion and debate. 

 

This site uses cookies and other tracking technologies to assist with navigation and your ability to provide feedback, analyse your use of the site and services and assist with our member communication efforts. Privacy Policy. Accept cookies Cookie Settings